Engineering Consultant

Looking for ADA Compliance in Sutter Creek, CA?

Biondi Paving & Engineering is a Fully Licensed and Insured, Family Owned Paving Company serving the Sacramento area.

Paving projects require an experienced, professional team that knows what they are doing. Don’t leave your driveway or parking lot in the hands of a new company who may have never done a project like it before. Call someone who has “been there, done that” and can approach your project with excellence.

With over 70 years of experience helping customers in our area, we’re confident we can handle any paving project you have in mind - all while providing great customer service at rock-solid pricing you can count on.

Schedule Your FREE Consultation [Local Landers]

About Biondi

Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!

Amedeo Biondi 1948-1954

About Biondi 1

Gene Biondi 1955-1985

About Biondi 2

Steve Biondi 1986-Present

About Biondi 3

Insurance:

Broker Of Record:
Interwest Insurance Services
PO Box 255188
Sacramento Ca 95865-5188
(916) 488-3100

Workers Compensation:
Artisans Insurance LTD
A Member-Owned Group Captive Program
Specific Excess Reinsurance coverage by Zurich North America
Mike McStocker, CPCU – mmcstocker@iwins.com

Commercial General Liability & Auto Insurance:
ASDA West
Asphalt Surface Development Association
Regional Purchasing Group
$2Million Commercial Liability Limits / $5Million Excess Liability Umbrella
Greg Scoville – gscoville@iwins.com

Bonding:
Great American Insurance Company
A.M. Best# 002213
Rating A
Financial Size Category: XIII ( 1.25B- 1.5B)
Renee Ramsey, Administrator – rramsey@iwins.com

Financial:

D-U-N-S # 041649369
Business Lending
Confirmation Letter

Bonding Reference Letter:

What Our Customers Say...

NaSyR

stars

"Got to say the work they do is so much better than I've seen other companies do and I have seen pictures from other companies compared to biondi."

Jorge Dominguez

stars

"Great friendly work place"

Chuck Horton

stars

"Biondi Paving & Engineering did our site work, they did an excellent job. On time, on budget and high quality!"

Erin Gallagher

stars

About ADA Compliance

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a wide-ranging civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools and transportation. The ADA also requires businesses to comply with specific accessibility standards when making physical changes to their facilities or providing goods and services.

What does the ADA require me to do?

The ADA requires you to take "readily achievable" steps to remove any barriers in your business that would prevent people with disabilities from having full access to your goods or services. You are not required to make any changes that are not necessary to provide needed access. You are also not required to take any measures that would result in undue financial or administrative burdens. Under the ADA, "readily achievable" means easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense. If you can demonstrate that your business has taken commercially feasible steps to comply with the ADA's requirements, you cannot be found non-compliant.

What if I don't make changes to my business?

If you do not take steps to remove barriers or provide goods and services in an accessible manner, people with disabilities may file a complaint with the Justice Department for discrimination under the ADA. If the Justice Department investigates and finds that you discriminated against people with disabilities, it can require you to make changes or it can get a court order requiring you to make the necessary changes.

What is "readily achievable"?

"Readily achievable" means that taking steps to remove barriers and provide goods and services in an accessible manner would require minimal difficulty or expense on your part. The term readily achievable does not require that any steps be taken that would result in undue financial and administrative burdens. What is readily achievable is determined on a case-by-case basis, with the assessment of several factors including:

  • The nature and cost of the action;
  • The nature and cost of the action;
  • The type of operation you have;
  • The numbers of people employed there;
  • The effect on expenses and resources;
  • The geographic separateness, and the administrative or fiscal relationship of the facility or part of a facility that would need to be modified.

The steps you can take to ensure your compliance with ADA requirements may include:

  • Repositioning display racks, shelves, furniture and other equipment;
  • Installing ramps or modifying existing ones to provide access to your business and its services for people with mobility disabilities;
  • Making changes in the way you provide goods or services so they are accessible to persons with disabilities;
  • Providing readers, taped texts, qualified interpreters or other auxiliary aids where necessary to ensure effective communication with customers, clients, patients or participants who are deaf or hard of hearing;
  • Restructuring a job position to better accommodate the needs of an employee who is not fully able to participate in the job because of a disability.

To better understand your obligations under Title III, you may wish to consult an attorney.

How do I create accessible parking spaces?

The Federal Highway Administration's "Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines for Building and Facilities" has the following information on parking spaces:

Note that this is not exhaustive, but it provides an overview of all the steps necessary. The ADAAG does say that parking lot design guidelines are available from some state departments of transportation.

Make sure your employees are fully aware of these guidelines as well, so they can make sure to provide accessible parking spaces. Include the following paragraph in your company policy on disabilities:

Please note that all new buildings should have accessible parking spaces available, as required by ADA requirements. These requirements include appropriate signage designating accessible parking, vertical clearance for vehicle lift or ramp entry, clearly marked spaces that are level, and an adjacent path of travel that connects the accessible parking with the entrance to the establishment.

Why should I make my business accessible?

There are several reasons why your business should be made ADA-compliant:

  • Enables you to reach out to a broader market;
  • Helps increase sales because people who require special assistance are more likely to frequent your business because it is accessible;
  • Makes customers feel welcome, which helps customers promote the accessibility of your establishment.

As an owner or manager of a business, you want the public to know that the services you are offering are open to everyone. Without meeting ADA requirements, people with disabilities may avoid entering your establishment.

How can a paving company help me be compliant?

Updating your parking lot with ADA regulations can help you to stay compliant. Paving companies offer new surfaces that are compliant with ADA regulations. It is important that your employees are aware of the regulations before they pour concrete, so they ensure compliance. Include these regulations in your employee handbook.

Why should I work with a paving company for my ADA-compliant parking lot?

A paving company can help you to meet or exceed ADA regulations for your parking lot. The Department of Transportation has specific guidelines that need to be followed when it comes to slot, aisle, and surface clearances. Every business is required by law to have accessible parking spaces. Contact a paving company today to learn more about the regulations, and how they can help to create an accessible parking lot for your business.

How can I maintain ADA compliance?

Compliance is essential for the success of any establishment. There are a few ways to maintain ADA compliance - through restructure, reallocation of resources, or by creating an environment that is accessible to people with disabilities. Remember, if your business does not comply with ADA regulations, customers might think it means you do not want their business and they will avoid your establishment.

The best way to create and maintain ADA compliance is to educate all employees on what needs to be done and how to go about it. This includes training on how certain tools can help improve accessibility such as ramps and elevators. Not only will this help you stay compliant with ADA regulations but it will also increase customer traffic by making them feel more comfortable visiting your establishment.

If you are unable to make your establishment ADA compliant, there other options you should consider. You may want to prioritize certain areas of your business, or make it ADA compliant in phases. For example, if the entrance is not compliant but the back of the store is, customers can still access what they need without entering through non-ADA compliant areas.

If you are not able to afford the costs associated with making your business ADA compliant, there are other options available. You might consider finding a partner or another company that can help you offset costs. For example, if an accessible bathroom is too costly for your business to install, you might consider asking a local restaurant if they would let you use theirs if your customers make a purchase.

The ADA is a law that requires businesses to be accessible for people with disabilities. A paving company can help you make your parking lot ADA compliant, but there are other ways to maintain compliance as well. If you do not meet the requirements of the ADA, some options might include prioritizing certain areas of your business or making things accessible in phases by creating an environment that is accessible to all customers and employees - even if they have special needs.

 

About Sutter Creek

The community takes its name from nearby Sutter Creek, which in turn has the name of early California developer John Sutter.

Sutter's discovery of gold at nearby Coloma in January 1848 triggered the California Gold Rush. After all his workers left him to go on their own hunts for gold, Sutter moved to Mormon Island with a couple of hands. After about two weeks miners flooded the island, so Sutter and his hands left and returned to Sutter Creek. Sutter said: "I broke up the camp and started on the march further south, and located my next camp on Sutter Creek, now in Amador County, and thought that I should be there alone. The work was going on well for a while, until three or four traveling grog-shops surrounded me, at from one-half to ten miles (16 km) distance from the camp. Then, of course, the gold was taken to these places, for drinking, gambling, etc., and then the following day they were sick and unable to work, and became deeper and more indebted to me, particularly the Kanakas [native Hawaiians]." Shortly thereafter Sutter moved out of Sutter Creek and back to his fort.

Sutter Creek became a destination for fortune hunters. A post office was established in 1852, and Sutter Creek became a town in 1854 that incorporated in 1913.

Although plenty of placer gold was found there, gold-bearing quartz deposits were discovered in 1851, and mining those deposits for gold became the mainstay of the local economy for many years. With the prosperity brought by quartz mining, Sutter Creek became a boomtown. By 1932, the Central Eureka mine, begun in 1869, had reached the 2,300-foot (700 m) level. By 1939, it was the best-paying mine in Sutter Creek. The mines continued operations until 1942, when most gold mines were closed for manpower reasons during World War II.

Today, Sutter Creek is a tourist town with many shops and restaurants. The town itself is registered as California Historical Landmark #322.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Sutter Creek had a population of 2,501. The population density was 977.8 inhabitants per square mile (377.5/km2). The racial makeup of Sutter Creek was 2,272 (90.8%) White, 10 (0.4%) African American, 34 (1.4%) Native American, 65 (2.6%) Asian, 5 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 40 (1.6%) from other races, and 75 (3.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 219 persons (8.8%).

The Census reported that 2,500 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 1 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 1,168 households, out of which 258 (22.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 500 (42.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 109 (9.3%) had a female householder with no husband present, 51 (4.4%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 65 (5.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 15 (1.3%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 418 households (35.8%) were made up of individuals, and 239 (20.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14. There were 660 families (56.5% of all households); the average family size was 2.77.

The population was spread out, with 466 people (18.6%) under the age of 18, 191 people (7.6%) aged 18 to 24, 426 people (17.0%) aged 25 to 44, 768 people (30.7%) aged 45 to 64, and 650 people (26.0%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.2 males.

There were 1,367 housing units at an average density of 534.4 per square mile (206.3/km), of which 1,168 were occupied, of which 626 (53.6%) were owner-occupied, and 542 (46.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.6%; the rental vacancy rate was 14.6%. 1,355 people (54.2% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 1,145 people (45.8%) lived in rental housing units.

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,303 people, 1,025 households, and 658 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,377.3 inhabitants per square mile (531.8/km2). There were 1,106 housing units at an average density of 661.4 per square mile (255.4/km). The racial makeup of the city was 91.45% White, 0.22% African American, 1.30% Native American, 1.04% Asian, 0.30% Pacific Islander, 2.13% from other races, and 3.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.82% of the population.

Of the 1,025 households, 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.79.

23.2% of residents were under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 20.3% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 22.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $47,000, and the median income for a family was $55,795. Males had a median income of $46,563 versus $30,188 for females. The per capita income was $23,100. About 4.9% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.5% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.

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