Construction Company

Looking for a General Engineering Contractor in Marysville, CA?

Biondi Paving & Engineering is a Fully Licensed and Insured, Family Owned Paving Company serving the Sacramento area.

Paving projects require an experienced, professional team that knows what they are doing. Don’t leave your driveway or parking lot in the hands of a new company who may have never done a project like it before. Call someone who has “been there, done that” and can approach your project with excellence.

With over 70 years of experience helping customers in our area, we’re confident we can handle any paving project you have in mind - all while providing great customer service at rock-solid pricing you can count on.

Schedule Your FREE Consultation [Local Landers]

About Biondi

Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!

Amedeo Biondi 1948-1954

About Biondi 1

Gene Biondi 1955-1985

About Biondi 2

Steve Biondi 1986-Present

About Biondi 3

Insurance:

Broker Of Record:
Interwest Insurance Services
PO Box 255188
Sacramento Ca 95865-5188
(916) 488-3100

Workers Compensation:
Artisans Insurance LTD
A Member-Owned Group Captive Program
Specific Excess Reinsurance coverage by Zurich North America
Mike McStocker, CPCU – mmcstocker@iwins.com

Commercial General Liability & Auto Insurance:
ASDA West
Asphalt Surface Development Association
Regional Purchasing Group
$2Million Commercial Liability Limits / $5Million Excess Liability Umbrella
Greg Scoville – gscoville@iwins.com

Bonding:
Great American Insurance Company
A.M. Best# 002213
Rating A
Financial Size Category: XIII ( 1.25B- 1.5B)
Renee Ramsey, Administrator – rramsey@iwins.com

Financial:

D-U-N-S # 041649369
Business Lending
Confirmation Letter

Bonding Reference Letter:

What Our Customers Say...

NaSyR

stars

"Got to say the work they do is so much better than I've seen other companies do and I have seen pictures from other companies compared to biondi."

Jorge Dominguez

stars

"Great friendly work place"

Chuck Horton

stars

"Biondi Paving & Engineering did our site work, they did an excellent job. On time, on budget and high quality!"

Erin Gallagher

stars

About General Engineering Contractor

If you have been spending a lot of time looking for the best General Engineering Contractors, there are a few things that you should keep in mind before you make your choice. A General Engineering Contractor is responsible for the design and construction of public works, such as dams, sewers, private roadways and others. They are also responsible for the analysis of these projects and provide the estimate of cost of the project including a timetable. A General Engineering Contractor usually contracts with private parties to perform specific jobs, which includes the design and construction of water treatment plants, tunnels and airports, bridges and harbors, public roads and highways, sewage treatment and disposal, surface transportation of waste, subsurface drainage systems and water systems, underground railroads and telecommunications.

It doesn't matter whether you need a General Engineering Contractor for a small project or a huge one, the first step that you must take is to find one. There are many ways that you can do this, the most common ones include searching the internet, asking your friends and relatives who are also contractors, taking a job in the construction industry or by applying for a job in a construction firm. The Internet is the best place to start when you are looking for a general engineering contractor since you will be able to access a large number of firms that specialize in different types of projects. The next thing that you can do is to ask your friends and relatives if they know anyone that has used the services of a general engineering contractor, or you can also search for them online.

Once you have found a company or two that you feel comfortable working with, you can then interview them to get their thoughts on how you can benefit from a service like theirs. Asking a general engineering contractor questions will give you a better idea on what kind of work that they are capable of doing, and what kind of prices they charge. After all, your first goal is to make sure that your treatment plant is efficient enough to keep up with the demands that your business is currently making. You don't want to pay for contractors who will only be able to maintain your existing level of service. Another important question that you should ask your contractor is how long they have been in business. Since a new company will be able to provide better services than an established one, you will want to choose them over the older ones.

It takes four years to complete the licensing process. The good thing about this is that it allows you to focus on quality work instead of worrying about the duration of the license. Four years is enough to train your contractors and help them get familiarized with the procedures that they need to follow in order to be licensed. The reason why you need to check the length of time that the company has been in operation is because a lot of the fraudulent companies don't actually last for this long. After four years of business, you can expect to see a major turn around when it comes to their work.

One of the things that your licensing process will consist of involves taking a test that will measure your potential as a general engineering contractor. Applicants must pass this exam in order to ensure that they are qualified to apply for the jobs. There are many different tests that can be taken in order to evaluate the suitability of applicants, so make sure that you request that your contractors take one of them. Before taking any of these exams, however, make sure that you check if your contractors have taken one of them first so that you can evaluate their performance.

In order to complete the entire licensing process, you will be required to pass a major examination. This exam will cover everything from general engineering contractor duties to water supply safety. To get your license, you need to be knowledgeable about all of the things that you will be responsible for. By finding a person who has plenty of experience doing the kinds of tasks that you are interested in, you will be able to gain everything that you need to get started.

 

About Marysville

Marysville is located on the ancestral land of the Maidu, who occupied the area for 10,000 years prior to the arrival of Jedediah Smith and trappers from the Hudson Bay Company in 1828, who were the first non-natives to explore the area. Spanish and Mexican explorers never reached that far north on the Feather River. In 1842, John Sutter leased part of his Rancho New Helvetia land to Theodore Cordua, a native of Mecklenburg in Germany, who raised livestock, and in 1843 built a home and trading post he called New Mecklenburg. The trading post and home was situated at what would later become the southern end of 'D' Street, Marysville's main street. In 1844, the Mexican government granted Cordua his own land grant, Rancho Honcut.

In 1848, Charles Covillaud, a former employee of Cordua, discovered riches in the gold fields and bought half of the Cordua ranch. In January 1849, Michael C. Nye and William Foster, brothers-in-law of Covillaud's wife, Mary Murphy, a survivor of the Donner Party, bought the other half of the Cordua ranch. They later sold their interest to Covillaud. In October of the same year, Covillaud sold most of the ranch to Jose Ramirez, John Sampson, and Theodore Sicard. During the Gold Rush, the ranch became a stopping point for the riverboats from Sacramento and San Francisco that brought prospectors to the digging grounds. Even today a sign on the roadside as one enters Marysville describes it as the "Gateway to The Gold Fields."

In 1850, Covillaud, Ramirez, Sampson, and Sicard hired Augustus Le Plongeon, a French surveyor, to create a plan for a town called Jubaville, later called Yubaville. Stephen J. Field, a newly relocated attorney, purchased 65 lots of land and drew up proper deeds for land being sold. Then, after just three days in the mining camp, he accepted the nomination to run for alcalde, a Mexican official, which combined the duties of a mayor and justice of the peace, in a new government that was being formed. On January 18, 1850, Field defeated his rival, who had been in town just six days, and a town council was elected. That night, the townsfolk decided to name the new town Marysville after Charles Covillaud's wife, Mary Murphy Covillaud, the former wife of William Johnson of Johnson's Ranch, and one of the surviving members of the Donner Party. After Marysville was incorporated by the new California Legislature, the first mayor was elected in 1851. Field went on to become one of the longest sitting members of the United States Supreme Court.

A post office was established at Marysville in 1851. By 1853, the tent city had been replaced by brick buildings. In addition to the brick merchant buildings, Marysville had developed mills, iron works, factories, machine shops, schools, churches and two daily newspapers. The population was almost 10,000. By 1857, Marysville had become one of the largest cities in California, due to its strategic location. Over $10 million in gold was shipped from the banks in Marysville to the U.S. Mint in San Francisco. The city's founders imagined Marysville becoming "The New York of the Pacific."

Debris loosed by hydraulic mining above Marysville raised the riverbeds of both the Feather and the Yuba Rivers and rendered the city vulnerable to flooding during winter storms and spring run-offs. The city built a levee system that is still maintained today. The levee system sealed the city off and has made additional city growth virtually impossible; as such the population has not increased much since their construction and Marysville is known as "California's Oldest 'Little' City." The hydraulic mining debris choked the Feather River and soon the riverboats could not make the trip to Marysville.

Marysville was home to a significant Chinese American community beginning in the 1850s. While many Chinese were driven forcibly from their homes throughout California between 1870 and 1900, Marysville became a place of refuge for them and was one of the few Chinatowns in the state that did not experience violence. The Chinese Bok Kai Temple claims to be the oldest continually operating Taoist temple in America, and a Chinese New Year festival has been celebrated in Marysville since 1880. The historical importance of Marysville to the Chinese-American community has been imprinted in its language. In Cantonese, Marysville is known as Sahm Fou (三埠, Third City); Sacramento Yee Fou (二埠, Second City); and San Francisco Dai Fou (大埠, The Big City).

There was also an active Jewish merchant community in Marysville from the Gold Rush era through the early years of the twentieth century. Nathan Schneider established Schneider's Clothing in 1862, it was advertised as "the Home of Values", and it existed until the late 1980s. Isaac and Simon Glazier ran the Old Corner Cigar Store from 1851 to 1862, when they moved to San Francisco. J.H. Marcuse founded the Western and Palace Cigar Store. Philip Brown advertised himself as "Marysville's leading tailor, pants made to order from $4.00 up and P. Brown's specialty, White Labor Overall." Union Lumber, established in 1852 by W.K. Hudson and Samuel Harryman, was later purchased by bookkeeper H.J. Cheim, and is still owned by the Cheim family.

In 2010, the Marysville City Council made a decision to sell a portion of Washington Square Park for development of a commercial shopping center, part of an effort to increase tax revenue. This came after the city won a costly legal battle brought on by the Citizens to Preserve Marysville's Parks, a group of citizens opposed to development in the city's green spaces. A mitigation measure to offset the loss of city green space is technically within city limits, but falls outside the city's levee ring.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Marysville had a population of 12,072. The population density was 3,367.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,300.4/km2). The racial makeup of Marysville was

The Census reported that 11,402 people (94.4% of the population) lived in households, 145 (1.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 525 (4.3%) were institutionalized.

There were 4,668 households, out of which 1,571 (33.7%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,551 (33.2%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 836 (17.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 318 (6.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 453 (9.7%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 35 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,606 households (34.4%) were made up of individuals, and 579 (12.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44. There were 2,705 families (57.9% of all households); the average family size was 3.14.

The population was spread out, with 3,032 people (25.1%) under the age of 18, 1,569 people (13.0%) aged 18 to 24, 3,158 people (26.2%) aged 25 to 44, 2,860 people (23.7%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,453 people (12.0%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.5 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.

There were 5,196 housing units at an average density of 1,449.6 per square mile (559.7/km), of which 1,828 (39.2%) were owner-occupied, and 2,840 (60.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.7%; the rental vacancy rate was 10.2%. 4,571 people (37.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 6,831 people (56.6%) lived in rental housing units.

As of the census of 2000, there were 12,268 people, 4,687 households, and 2,826 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,501.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,351.8/km2). There were 4,999 housing units at an average density of 1,426.6 per square mile (550.8/km). The racial makeup of the city was 71.0% White, 4.8% African American, 2.3% Native American, 6.0% Asian (including many Hmong people), 0.2% Pacific Islander, 10.1% from other races, and 5.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.5% of the population.

There were 4,687 households, out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.8% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. 31.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.14.

The population was spread out, with 27.5% under the age of 18, 11.7% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 18.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,494, and the median income for a family was $33,474. Males had a median income of $27,630 versus $20,240 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,315. About 15.2% of families and 18.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.9% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.

Related Pages:

Scroll to Top