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Looking for a General Engineering Contractor in Walnut Grove, CA?

Biondi Paving & Engineering is a Fully Licensed and Insured, Family Owned Paving Company serving the Sacramento area.

Paving projects require an experienced, professional team that knows what they are doing. Don’t leave your driveway or parking lot in the hands of a new company who may have never done a project like it before. Call someone who has “been there, done that” and can approach your project with excellence.

With over 70 years of experience helping customers in our area, we’re confident we can handle any paving project you have in mind - all while providing great customer service at rock-solid pricing you can count on.

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About Biondi

Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!

Amedeo Biondi 1948-1954

About Biondi 1

Gene Biondi 1955-1985

About Biondi 2

Steve Biondi 1986-Present

About Biondi 3

Insurance:

Broker Of Record:
Interwest Insurance Services
PO Box 255188
Sacramento Ca 95865-5188
(916) 488-3100

Workers Compensation:
Artisans Insurance LTD
A Member-Owned Group Captive Program
Specific Excess Reinsurance coverage by Zurich North America
Mike McStocker, CPCU – mmcstocker@iwins.com

Commercial General Liability & Auto Insurance:
ASDA West
Asphalt Surface Development Association
Regional Purchasing Group
$2Million Commercial Liability Limits / $5Million Excess Liability Umbrella
Greg Scoville – gscoville@iwins.com

Bonding:
Great American Insurance Company
A.M. Best# 002213
Rating A
Financial Size Category: XIII ( 1.25B- 1.5B)
Renee Ramsey, Administrator – rramsey@iwins.com

Financial:

D-U-N-S # 041649369
Business Lending
Confirmation Letter

Bonding Reference Letter:

What Our Customers Say...

NaSyR

stars

"Got to say the work they do is so much better than I've seen other companies do and I have seen pictures from other companies compared to biondi."

Jorge Dominguez

stars

"Great friendly work place"

Chuck Horton

stars

"Biondi Paving & Engineering did our site work, they did an excellent job. On time, on budget and high quality!"

Erin Gallagher

stars

About General Engineering Contractor

If you have been spending a lot of time looking for the best General Engineering Contractors, there are a few things that you should keep in mind before you make your choice. A General Engineering Contractor is responsible for the design and construction of public works, such as dams, sewers, private roadways and others. They are also responsible for the analysis of these projects and provide the estimate of cost of the project including a timetable. A General Engineering Contractor usually contracts with private parties to perform specific jobs, which includes the design and construction of water treatment plants, tunnels and airports, bridges and harbors, public roads and highways, sewage treatment and disposal, surface transportation of waste, subsurface drainage systems and water systems, underground railroads and telecommunications.

It doesn't matter whether you need a General Engineering Contractor for a small project or a huge one, the first step that you must take is to find one. There are many ways that you can do this, the most common ones include searching the internet, asking your friends and relatives who are also contractors, taking a job in the construction industry or by applying for a job in a construction firm. The Internet is the best place to start when you are looking for a general engineering contractor since you will be able to access a large number of firms that specialize in different types of projects. The next thing that you can do is to ask your friends and relatives if they know anyone that has used the services of a general engineering contractor, or you can also search for them online.

Once you have found a company or two that you feel comfortable working with, you can then interview them to get their thoughts on how you can benefit from a service like theirs. Asking a general engineering contractor questions will give you a better idea on what kind of work that they are capable of doing, and what kind of prices they charge. After all, your first goal is to make sure that your treatment plant is efficient enough to keep up with the demands that your business is currently making. You don't want to pay for contractors who will only be able to maintain your existing level of service. Another important question that you should ask your contractor is how long they have been in business. Since a new company will be able to provide better services than an established one, you will want to choose them over the older ones.

It takes four years to complete the licensing process. The good thing about this is that it allows you to focus on quality work instead of worrying about the duration of the license. Four years is enough to train your contractors and help them get familiarized with the procedures that they need to follow in order to be licensed. The reason why you need to check the length of time that the company has been in operation is because a lot of the fraudulent companies don't actually last for this long. After four years of business, you can expect to see a major turn around when it comes to their work.

One of the things that your licensing process will consist of involves taking a test that will measure your potential as a general engineering contractor. Applicants must pass this exam in order to ensure that they are qualified to apply for the jobs. There are many different tests that can be taken in order to evaluate the suitability of applicants, so make sure that you request that your contractors take one of them. Before taking any of these exams, however, make sure that you check if your contractors have taken one of them first so that you can evaluate their performance.

In order to complete the entire licensing process, you will be required to pass a major examination. This exam will cover everything from general engineering contractor duties to water supply safety. To get your license, you need to be knowledgeable about all of the things that you will be responsible for. By finding a person who has plenty of experience doing the kinds of tasks that you are interested in, you will be able to gain everything that you need to get started.

 

About Walnut Grove

Walnut Grove is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sacramento County, California, United States. It is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,542 at the 2010 census, up from 669 at the 2000 census.

Walnut Grove is located at 38°14′37″N 121°30′44″W / 38.24361°N 121.51222°W / 38.24361; -121.51222 (38.243490, −121.512100).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.9 square miles (28 km), of which, 10.2 square miles (26 km2) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km) of it (6.62%) is water.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Walnut Grove had a population of 1,542. The population density was 141.2 inhabitants per square mile (54.5/km2). The racial makeup of Walnut Grove was 943 (61.2%) White, 15 (1.0%) African American, 24 (1.6%) Native American, 110 (7.1%) Asian, 0 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 402 (26.1%) from other races, and 48 (3.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 673 persons (43.6%).

The Census reported that 1,533 people (99.4% of the population) lived in households, 9 (0.6%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 585 households, out of which 182 (31.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 293 (50.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 56 (9.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 41 (7.0%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 35 (6.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 4 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 165 households (28.2%) were made up of individuals, and 66 (11.3%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62. There were 390 families (66.7% of all households); the average family size was 3.23.

The population was spread out, with 357 people (23.2%) under the age of 18, 137 people (8.9%) aged 18 to 24, 376 people (24.4%) aged 25 to 44, 432 people (28.0%) aged 45 to 64, and 240 people (15.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 112.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.9 males.

There were 689 housing units at an average density of 63.1 per square mile (24.4/km), of which 309 (52.8%) were owner-occupied, and 276 (47.2%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.6%; the rental vacancy rate was 6.7%. 701 people (45.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 832 people (54.0%) lived in rental housing units.

As of the census of 2000, there were 669 people, 245 households, and 159 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 214.8 inhabitants per square mile (82.9/km2). There were 282 housing units at an average density of 90.5 per square mile (34.9/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 49.78% White, 1.49% African American, 3.14% Native American, 21.23% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 19.13% from other races, and 5.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 46.79% of the population.

There were 245 households, out of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.1% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.46.

In the CDP, the population was spread out, with 25.3% under the age of 18, 11.4% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 18.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $40,179, and the median income for a family was $39,667. Males had a median income of $41,563 versus $23,417 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $14,939. About 14.0% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under age 18 and 3.0% of those age 65 or over.

Established in 1850 by John W. Sharp, Walnut Grove is one of the earliest settlements along the Sacramento River. Sharp journeyed west from Ohio with his young family and chose the site of Walnut Grove because of the abundant walnut and oak forests in the area. The town quickly prospered as an agricultural center and riverboat stop (the forests were timbered for steamboat firewood). It was also a major shipping port by 1865 for agricultural produce and fish, with the Bartlett pear as its primary product. By 1870, it had become a thriving town full of small businesses (many owned by the Sharp family), a school, post office, and Union Guard Armory.

After Sharp's death in 1880, the heirs sold a large portion of the estate to Agnes Brown and her son Alex. The Brown family subsequently became heavily involved in the commercial life of the community, operating a general store, hotel, and asparagus packing house, as well as the Bank of Alex Brown. Due to the demands for rich agricultural land over time, although the town has remained compact in size, it holds the distinction of being the only river town along the Sacramento River to occupy both the east and west riverbanks.

Ferry service operated for many years between parts of town on either side of the river until the first bridge was opened in 1916. The bridge, since replaced by a modern span, was the first cantilevered counterweight bascule drawbridge constructed west of the Mississippi River. It was officially opened by the Governor of California, who traveled with various dignitaries to Walnut Grove on the gubernatorial yacht.[when?]

As early as 1914, a large Japanese community lived in Walnut Grove, which they called "Kawashimo". The Nichi-Bei Nenkan (Japanese American Yearbook) of 1914 includes a directory of 67 Japanese-owned businesses, including one tofu shop: Sakai Tofu-ya. There was still a tofu shop in town in 1975, according to The Book of Tofu.

The community was racially segregated up to the start of World War II. Only whites were allowed to own homes on the west side of the river. Even on the east side, the Asians separated into a Japanese section and a Chinese section. There were two elementary schools, a "white" school and Walnut Grove Oriental Elementary, until the Japanese were forcibly moved out of the area at the start of World War II. Then, the two elementary schools were combined. After elementary school, the students were bused to Courtland for high school, until that school became identified as an earthquake hazard.

The Chinese residents primarily immigrated from two different areas of the Guangdong Pearl River Delta region of China; immigrants from Zhongshan resided in Locke, while those from Taishan populated Walnut Grove. During the Sino-Japanese War in the 1930s, the Walnut Grove-Locke-Isleton area was a prime target for visiting Chinese government VIPs to raise funds for the Chinese government.[citation needed]

The principal activities in the Walnut Grove Chinese community were operating illegal gambling houses and Chinese restaurants. These services were primarily for migrant farm workers from the Philippines. "Whites" were not allowed to enter for fear they might be police authorities. Routine police raids were staged during election times to demonstrate the Sacramento County Sheriff's "fight against crime".

In the early 1930s, Walnut Grove was a thriving community until fire again consumed the Chinese section in the mid-1930s. In its glory days of the 1930s and early 1940s, a daily shuttle operated by the Ow family carried Chinese to and from San Francisco; it also accepted and executed orders for merchandise from San Francisco. The route started from Courtland with stops at Locke, Walnut Grove, and Isleton and returned nightly.

After World War II, gambling operations ceased. Members from the small Chinese community in Walnut Grove moved to the cities and many elder Filipinos returned to their homeland. The town now hosts both the Walnut Grove Chinese-American Historic District [Wikidata] and Walnut Grove Japanese-American Historic District.

Sugar beet harvesting was active up to the late 1940s. There were two leading areas where beets were unloaded from trucks into a hopper, then conveyed up a belt to fill Southern Pacific railroad cars for the trip north to Sacramento for processing. Asian women worked in fruit packing houses throughout the Delta area [Locke, Walnut Grove, Ryde, Isleton] while men worked in the fields.

In 1961, documentary photographer Pirkle Jones did a photo essay on Walnut Grove.

Walnut Grove's location has made it the site of a rare collection of very tall radio and television transmission towers. The first major tower here was the KXTV/KOVR/KCRA Tower built in 1962, which dominated the skyline for over twenty years with its 1,548 foot height. In 1985 the old tower was joined by taller structures. The guyed KXTV/KOVR Tower is, with a height of 2,048 feet, one of the tallest constructions in the world. Two other guyed towers of similar height are the 1,996 foot high Channel 40 Tower, KTXL, and the 2,000 foot high Hearst-Argyle Tower. Towers sited here at the natural corner of the California Central Valley have line of sight coverage of flat valley floor for over 60 miles(100 kilometers) to the north and to the south-southeast, and quite good coverage into the Sierra foothills and mountains across the valley to the northeast and east. However, these towers and their guy-wires are a significant hazard to aircraft, which can otherwise freely cross most of the Central Valley at 656 feet of altitude.

Delta Meadows State Recreation Area

Located along the Railroad Slough Levee, and accessed from the River Road between Walnut Grove and Locke, via a small gravel road just north-east of the Delta Cross Channel, a water diversion facility on the Sacramento River. Additionally, a docent program through Delta Natural History Association provides canoes with guides in the spring and fall, reserved through Brannan Island State Park.

The Walnut Grove Buddhist Church in the Japanese district was founded in 1926 to serve the spiritual needs of the community, with over 100 members prior to WWII. It also served as a temporary hostel to house families who had lost their homes following their incarceration during the war.

Through the 80s and 90s, church membership fell as many of the older generation passed away, although many local residents as well as the children and grandchildren of the original members continue to support the church through the popular annual summer Bazaar and Obon, providing much needed income to the church coffers.

Chan Tin-San is commonly credited as the earliest resident of Locke, California. He was the first Chinese person to construct a building on the Locke brothers' property, where he realized the business potential of the Southern Pacific wharf and warehouse. After the October 1916 fire which destroyed the Walnut Grove Chinatown, a number of Chung-San District people moved to the area and Locke was officially established. Lee Bing, the leader of the group, financed nine of the buildings. Locke is one of the only towns in the United States built entirely by Chinese. It was built in 1915 and burned down twice. Locke was a bustling place with gambling houses, merchant stores and a movie house all owned by the Chinese. Locke today is much like it was many years ago. Most of the original buildings are still standing. The Southern Pacific wharf and warehouse was built in three stages, the first in 1906. It grew to over 800 feet (240 m) in length. During the harvest season a half dozen or more fruit packers would rent space in the warehouse, among them were Scobel & Day, Simons & French, Earl Fruit Company, and the California Packing Corporation. The rail spur served the warehouse and connected with the Walnut Grove Branch line. The warehouse operated two freight elevators which raised produce from the decks of the riverboats. The warehouse is now used to store and launch pleasure boats.

In the California State Legislature, Walnut Grove is in the 3rd Senate District, represented by Democrat Bill Dodd, and in the 11th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Lori Wilson.

In the United States House of Representatives, Walnut Grove is in California's 3rd congressional district, represented by Republican Kevin Kiley.

In Sons of Anarchy, season 4/episode 10, "Hands", Jax Teller and Tara Knowles' family outing at Walnut Grove Park with their sons is cut short, and Tara's plan to attend a surgical conference in Providence, Oregon, at a hospital she plans to transfer to, is foiled when hit men hired by Clay Morrow abduct Tara from the park and severely wound her.

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